! microXchg 2016 - The Microservices Conference in Berlin

Berlin

Kalkscheune

2016

4th & 5th February

Many Speakers

250 Seats

Videos

Please check out our youtube channel.

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Speakers

Adrian Cockcroft

Adrian Cockcroft

Chris Richardson

Chris Richardson

Author of POJOs in Action, Founder of the original Cloud Foundry PaaS, Java Champion, JavaOne Rock Star

James Lewis

James Lewis

Principal Consultant at ThoughtWorks and Micro Services Pioneer

Fred George

Fred George

Father of the post-Agile process termed Developer Anarchy. Still writing code.

Peter Rossbach

Peter Rossbach

Peter Rossbach is a infracoder, system architect and coach of numerous web systems.

Russ Miles

Russ Miles

Chief Scientist at Simplicity Itself, author of "Antifragile Software: Building Adaptable Software with Microservices"

Sam Newman

Sam Newman

Technologist at ThoughtWorks, author of the book "Building Microservices".

Stefan Tilkov

Stefan Tilkov

Co-founder and principal consultant at innoQ

Uwe Friedrichsen

Uwe Friedrichsen

Loves distributed systems. Connects dots. Attracted by uncharted territory.

Schedule

4th February

Registration starts at 8:30

  • Go faster than your competitors (James Lewis)

    Go faster than your competitors. That’s the promise of microservices – deploy faster, scale faster, be more robust. It’s all about outcomes and the way your organisation is structured has a tremendous impact on those outcomes. it’s easy to say “Conway’s Law” and then move swiftly on. “But but but, but how?”

    In early 2014, James and Martin Fowler called out “Organised around business capabilities“ as a core characteristic of microservices. This was based on feedback from successful teams around the world about how important this aspect was on the systems they were building. In this talk, James explores some of these structures and provides some practical guidance on what he and Martin meant when they said “business capability”.

    James Lewis

    James studied Astrophysics in the 90’s but got sick of programming in Fortran. As a member of the ThoughtWorks Technical Advisory Board, the group that creates the Technology Radar, he contributes to industry adoption of open source and other tools, techniques, platforms and languages. For the last few years he has been working as a coding architect on projects built using microservices; exploring new patterns and ways of working as he goes.

    James has spoken at a number of UK and international conferences. His previous topics range from domain driven design, SOA and the future of the web to agile adoption patterns and lean thinking. He’s also heavily involved in the fledgling microservice community. He rather likes the fact that he got to describe his take on things jointly with Martin Fowler in an article that is influencing how people see the future of software architecture.

    ... more

  • News in Spring Cloud (Josh Long)

    Spring Cloud is an umbrella project that provides a variety of modules to support developers facing challenges typical in a microservices context: service discovery, resilience, distributed tracing etc.

    The talk starts with a brief introduction into the project and recap overall, followed by an in depth update on the recent additions to the project: distributed tracing with Zipkin, support for HashiCorp's Consul and Apache Zookeeper, advanced support for messaging, a new cluster module as well as improved CloudFoundry integration.

    Josh Long

    Josh (@starbuxman) is the Spring Developer Advocate at Pivotal. Josh is a Java Champion, author of 5 books (including O'Reilly's upcoming "Cloud Native Java: Designing Resilient Systems with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud, and Cloud Foundry") and 3 best-selling video trainings (including "Building Microservices with Spring Boot Livelessons" w/ Phil Webb), and an open-source contributor (Spring Boot, Spring Integration, Spring Cloud, Activiti and Vaadin)

    ... more

  • Microservice Deployment Pipelines With Spinnaker (Rick Buskens)

    A core aspect of a microservice architecture is individual deployability of services. Thus, orchestrating the roll out of these services should be as easy as possible. Historically Netflix has rolled out deployments using an open-source tool called Asgard. Spinnaker – the successor of Asgard and an open-source project as well – is a complete reimplementation of its predecessor and heavily improved.
    The talk introduces Spinnaker, the challenges it's trying to solve as well as the core concepts it's talking about. We then discuss and demo setting up a build pipeline as well as the various options in deployment targets, rollout strategies etc.

    Rick Buskens

    Rick Buskens is an engineering manager in the Developer Infrastructure group at Google, focused on building tools and technologies that help cloud developers build better software faster. Prior to joining Google, he led teams doing basic and applied research in software engineering at both Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories and Bell Labs. Rick has also dabbled in other areas of applied research, developing software tools for manufacturing (including 3D printing and robotics), military health care, brain-inspired computing, and networking.

    ... more

  • Lunch Break

  • A pattern language for microservices (Chris Richardson)

    When architecting an enterprise Java application, you need to choose between the traditional monolithic architecture consisting of a single large WAR file, or the more fashionable microservices architecture consisting of many smaller services. But rather than blindly picking the familiar or the fashionable, it’s important to remember what Fred Books said almost 30 years ago: there are no silver bullets in software. Every architectural decision has both benefits and drawbacks. Whether the benefits of one approach outweigh the drawbacks greatly depends upon the context of your particular project. Moreover, even if you adopt the microservices architecture, you must still make numerous other design decisions, each with their own trade-offs.
    A software pattern is an ideal way of describing a solution to a problem in a given context along with its tradeoffs. In this presentation, we describe a pattern language for microservices. You will learn about patterns that will help you decide when and how to use microservices vs. a monolithic architecture. We will also describe patterns that solve various problems in a microservice architecture including inter-service communication, service registration and service discovery.

    Chris Richardson

    Chris Richardson is a developer and architect. He is a Java Champion, a JavaOne rock star and the author of POJOs in Action, which describes how to build enterprise Java applications with frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate. Chris was also the founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, an early Java PaaS for Amazon EC2. He consults with organizations to improve how they develop and deploy applications and is working on his third startup.

    ... more

  • Real-world consistency explained (Uwe Friedrichsen)

    Here we are: Microservices, Container, Cloud ... and lots of data to deal with. Usually that's where the real trouble starts. Many developers still base their designs on the concept of perfectly consistent ACID transactions, everything being always consistent and in order, no anomalies around.
    But reality is different: Perfect consistency does not exist and many real-world use cases require much weaker consistency models in order to satisfy the scalability or robustness requirements.
    So, what are our options and what is the price we need to pay? Do we need to accept potentially losing data in order to get higher availability? How much can I scale without compromising consistency?
    In this session we will answer this and many more questions. We will also have a look at some popular data stores and examine what kind of consistency models you can achieve with them and how. Finally, we will have a peek into latest research and see new ideas that might push the borders of the current state-of-art.

    Uwe Friedrichsen

    Uwe Friedrichsen travels the IT world for many years. As a fellow of codecentric AG he is always in search of innovative ideas and concepts. His current focus areas are resilience, scalability and the IT of (the day after) tomorrow. Often, you can find him on conferences sharing his ideas, or as author of articles, blog posts, tweets and more.

    ... more

  • It’s Not Just MicroServices (Fred George)

    MicroServices implemented within a traditional IT structure will, at best, provide no benefits. To truly exploit the flexibility and raw deployment speed of MicroServices, complementary technology, IT processes, business interactions, and even roles and responsibilities must be adjusted. In this talk, we explain in plain language the reasons changes are essential. Further, we delve into solutions we have used in practice to create successful MicroService organizations.Complementary and Necessary Support for MicroServices

    Fred George

    ... more

  • Panel (Chris Richardson, Eberhard Wolff, Russell Miles, Susanne Kaiser, Sam Newman, Stefan Tilkov)

    Chris Richardson, Russell Miles, Sam Newman, Stefan Tllkov and Susanne Kaiser join Eberhard Wolff for an open discussion about the do’s and don’t’s of microservices. We will try to get the audience to ask the most important questions that are still open after the first day of the conference, and make sure we address the skeptics’ arguments. Have anything you’d like Eberhard to ask the panelists? Send him your favorite question to @ewolff on Twitter or be there when our panel starts to ask it yourself.

    Susanne Kaiser

    As the CTO at Just Software AG Susanne is responsible for the software development of JUST SOCIAL - providing apps for collaboration and communication in organizations. She has a background in computer sciences and experience in software development since more than 15 years.

    Russell Miles

    Russ Miles, when he’s not trying to achieve the wealth and, more importantly, the stable of motorbikes and cars of Tony Stark, is CTO and a founder of Simplicity Itself and GoMicro.Services.

    His job is to help enterprise clients adopt and get the benefits of microservices, period.

    He travels the world on this mission and, frankly, loves his job for it.

    Sam Newman

    I'm a developer at ThoughtWorks. I love learning new things and helping people build better systems.I've been working at ThoughtWorks for over a decade. I split my time between consulting for clients, speaking at conferences and helping build our own internal systems.My book, Building Microservices, was published by O'Reilly earlier this year.

    Chris Richardson

    Chris Richardson is a developer and architect. He is a Java Champion, a JavaOne rock star and the author of POJOs in Action, which describes how to build enterprise Java applications with frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate. Chris was also the founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, an early Java PaaS for Amazon EC2. He consults with organizations to improve how they develop and deploy applications and is working on his third startup.

    Stefan Tilkov

    Stefan Tilkov is a co-founder and principal consultant at innoQ. He
    consults on software architecture for distributed systems, with a
    special focus on applying the architecture of the Web to business
    systems. He has authored numerous articles and is a frequent speaker
    at conferences around the world.

    Eberhard Wolff

    Eberhard Wolff has 15+ years of experience as an architect and consultant - often on the intersection of business and technology. He is a Fellow at innoQ in Germany. As a speaker, he has given talks at international conferences and as an author, he has written more than 100 articles and books e.g. about Microservices. His technological focus is on modern architectures – often involving Cloud, Continuous Delivery, DevOps, Microservices or NoSQL.

    ... more

  • From Monolith to Microservices (Rodrigue Schaefer)

    In this talk, Head of Engineering Rodrigue Schaefer will discuss some of the challenges of Zalando's transition from monolith to microservices and how the company’s engineering team has tackled them through a combination of organizational decisions and development of new tools. He’ll discuss Zalando’s open-source PaaS framework STUPS (stups.io), which was built in-house to enable multiple teams to use the full power of AWS without scarifying vital aspects like security, traceability and architectural standards. Docker has played a key role in this architectural transformation and helps us to realize an easy and robust deployment process. 
    Rodrigue will also discuss how Zalando engineers are taking a microservices approach to front-end as well as back-end, through a rebuild of the company’s “shop”—the unit that includes our 15 country-specific, customer-facing websites. He’ll describe how the team is using tools like Hystrix and various resilience libraries to manage its growing microservices ecosystem. Finally, he’ll explain how microservices has enabled Zalando’s tech team to achieve a culture of autonomy, mastery and purpose that encourages innovation and experimentation.

    Rodrigue Schaefer

    Rodrigue Schaefer joined Zalando in 2014 as Head of Engineering. In his time with the company he has helped to build the Brand Solutions department from scratch and was one of the architects of Radical Agility: the management strategy adopted by Zalando’s tech team in early 2015 to foster autonomy, mastery and purpose team-wide. Since April 2015 he has been responsible for guiding the transformation of Zalando’s customer-facing fashion store from a monolith into a microservices architecture. Enabling innovation through people and technologies is at the heart of his work.

    ... more

  • Transformation from monolith to microservices - in a cloud and on-premise environment (Susanne Kaiser)

    Splitting our organization in smaller, autonomous teams and dividing our product JUST SOCIAL into single collaboration apps was the driving force to transform our monolithic system architecture into microservices. During this talk I would like to share some experiences we made during our microservices journey - especially when facing the challenge to distribute the product in the cloud AND as on-premise solution. 

    Susanne Kaiser

    As the CTO at Just Software AG Susanne is responsible for the software development of JUST SOCIAL - providing apps for collaboration and communication in organizations. She has a background in computer sciences and experience in software development since more than 15 years.

    ... more

  • The rumprun unikernel (Florian Gilcher)

    Full blown virtual machine or containers seems to be a huge question today. But there is an often ignored option: Unikernels. These are minimal kernels thatare just built to support just one application on top of a hypervisor. Insteadof having an additional kernel layer like containers, they work by never providing things an app doesn't need and rely on hypervisors for isolation.Like containers, the idea is not new, but the first implementations are comingto a practically usable state. Which leaves us with a question: how do we develop software on top of them?
    This introduces you to the rumprun unikernel and development on it. It features examples as well as a comparison with other systems.

    Florian Gilcher

    Florian Gilcher is CEO of asquera GmbH, a backend development company. He is also a community person, having run multiple conferences and usergroups. He is currently involved in the Rust Berlin usergroup and the global Rust community.

    His main interests are in the field of distributed development.

    ... more

  • Lunch Break

  • Lightning Talks I (Florian Thiel, Shahzada Hatim, Felix Müller)

    1) Microservices - with Monolith and other Diseases (Felix Müller)

    Ongoing microservice transition since 2 years. Rotting distributed monolith in the background and still alive. And independent development teams as our ultimate goal. Join our journey to Microtopia. In this talk I show you which problems we had to solve at E-Post since our microservice transition started. How do we set up 10 teams and empower them to work independently on their services? And which nifty challenges arise when you try to adapt your organizational structure to microservice architecture style. There is no silver bullet. I talk about our solutions and experiences with architectural constraints, technology stacks and humans.

    2) Challenges in adopting microservices for an internal service eco-sytem in a large corporation. (Shahzada Hatim)

    Before his current assignment the speaker had a year long opportunity to work for a corporation where microservices were chosen as the primary method of encouraging software re-use among independent business initiatives. The speaker and his team faced many challenges in adopting microservices architecture on top of the usual riddles of corporate software development. The challenges presented in this talk are specific to the case being described. However there are some learning pertinent for audience at large which this lightning-talk will summarise.

    3) Why microservices are not worth it! -- the long list of tradeoffs (Florian Thiel)

    Architecture decisions always involve tradeoffs. A Conway-structured organization, risk reduction through small services and massive scalability sound like dream-come-true arguments for abandoning your monolith and joining the microservice camp. Although nobody expects the transition to miroservices to be easy, I will argue that there is a very long list of often overlooked (or deemed very cheap) challenges. And maybe there is room for compromises... 

    Shahzada Hatim

    Hatim is a professional software developer, an amateur hardware hacker and an occasional/accidental sys-admin based in Stockholm. He is currently working at a financial technology startup. He has previously worked in the domains of physical security, online advertisement and industrial automation.

    Hatim is originally from Pakistan. He loves to help others learn about new concepts and to discuss unproven ideas with his peers. When not hacking-away he likes to relax by watching StarTrek and 90's sitcoms.

    Felix Müller

    Felix Müller works as Software Architect at E-Post Development GmbH. He is interested in everything which helps finding the best solution for a given problem. This covers newest trends in software architecture as well as modern management techniques to motivate teams.

    Florian Thiel

    Florian has had a DevOps hat before the term was coined. He dwells in systems thinking, culture hacking, visualization, programming and operations.

    He currently works at Deutsche Post E-Post Development and tweets at @noroute.

    ... more

  • Docker Ecosystem for Microservices (Peter Rossbach)

    This presentation gives an overview of the technical solutions for the orchestration of Docker based services and why it is so important for you to rethink your Microservice systems. To create, maintain and modify many machines and containers on your developer notebook, in the data center or the cloud is a challenge. Our applications are constantly being expanded and adapted to different use cases. The Docker ecosystem offers promising tools for service discovery, automatic scaling, failover and deployment. The talk presents the benefits of the tools and shows a practical Microservices system environment.

    Peter Rossbach

    Peter is a infracoder, system architect and coach of numerous web systems. His special interest is in the development of complex information systems, including the design and implementation of test-driven processes. Since 1997 Peter Rossbach is active in HTTP server and web container. He is a committer on the Apache Tomcat project and member of the Apache Software Foundation. His special interest is the design of provisioning, monitoring and analysis systems for complex infrastructures. With the bee42 solutions GmbH he realized appropriate infrastructure products and offer training based on the Docker ecosystem current web technologies, NoSQL databases and cloud platforms.

    ... more

  • While you're reading this, two new Docker PaaS have launched and one existing is shutting down (Dirk Breuer & Sebastian Schulze)

    We're deeply sorry if you decided to deploy a new product in 2016. Not only are systems getting more and more complex, but you're spoiltby the choice between oodles of infrastructure solutions. But donot fear as Docker is here. Containerization set out to redeem you from all your ops hassle. But since there are still minor inconvenienceslike Networking, Service Discovery, Persistence of even Security to be takencare of, your job isn't done with containerizing everything. All of the aboveare fundamental architectural decisions you shouldn't approach reckless.
    While Hashicorp tools are no silver bullet, they allow for pragmatic solutions while you still remain at the wheel. We want to show you how to set up an infrastructure suited for modern software needs.
    Disclaimer: We're not affiliated by any means with Hashicorp. We just happen to like their tools a lot ;-)

    Dirk Breuer & Sebastian Schulze

    Dirk and Sebastian are enrooted in the Ruby community, working as independent
    contractors in both web- and infrastructure projects at all kinds of scale. They
    guide clients through every stage of a software life cycle while keeping an eye
    on every layer of the stack. They embrace pragmatic solutions using the latest
    and greatest tools but won't shy away from deploying your 10 year old monolith.

    ... more

5th February

Registration starts at 8:30

  • Wait, what!? Our microservices have actual human users? (Stefan Tilkov)

    Microservice API styles, service lookups, datastores, scaling – all of our typical discussions about microservices seem to be centered around backend topics. But what about the user interface? How are we supposed to structure what is arguably the most important part of our applications – the one facing our users? In this session we’ll explore the role of the UI aspect in a microservice architecture, look at various methods of modularization, and derive a set of guidelines for avoiding monolithic frontends.

    Stefan Tilkov

    Stefan Tilkov is a co-founder and principal consultant at innoQ. He
    consults on software architecture for distributed systems, with a
    special focus on applying the architecture of the Web to business
    systems. He has authored numerous articles and is a frequent speaker
    at conferences around the world.

    ... more

  • Analyzing Response Time Distributions for Microservices (Adrian Cockcroft)

    The end to end response time of a network of microservices tends to have a wide distribution with a long tail at the 99th percentile, even if the mean is short. By collecting the response time distributions and throughput for request traces we can see how the individual microservices respond, but to combine these distributions and find which microservice is contributing the most to the 99th percentile requires application of montecarlo simulation. This talk will explain how this technique works and investigate tools ranging from Excel plugins to R packages that can implement montecarlo models.

    Adrian Cockcroft

    Adrian Cockcroft has had a long career working at the leading edge of technology. He’s always been fascinated by what comes next, and he writes and speaks extensively on a range of subjects. At Battery, he advises the firm and its portfolio companies about technology issues and also assists with deal sourcing and due diligence.

    Before joining Battery, Adrian helped lead Netflix’s migration to a large scale, highly available public-cloud architecture and the open sourcing of the cloud-native NetflixOSS platform. Prior to that at Netflix he managed a team working on personalization algorithms and service-oriented refactoring.

    Adrian was a founding member of eBay Research Labs, developing advanced mobile applications and even building his own homebrew phone, years before iPhone and Android launched. As a distinguished engineer at Sun Microsystems he wrote the best-selling “Sun Performance and Tuning” book and was chief architect for High Performance Technical Computing.

    He graduated from The City University, London with a Bsc in Applied Physics and Electronics, and was named one of the top leaders in Cloud Computing in 2011 and 2012 by SearchCloudComputing magazine. He can usually be found on Twitter @adrianco.

    ... more

  • Security and Microservices (Sam Newman)

    Microservices give us many options. We can pick different technologies, mix synchronous and asynchronous integration techniques or embrace different deployment patterns. But they also give us different options in how we think about securing our systems. Done right, and microservices can increase the security of your vital data and processes. Done wrong, and you can increase the surface area of attack. This talk will discuss the importance of defence in depth, discussing the many different ways in which you can secure your fine-grained, distributed architectures.

    Sam Newman

    I'm a developer at ThoughtWorks. I love learning new things and helping people build better systems.I've been working at ThoughtWorks for over a decade. I split my time between consulting for clients, speaking at conferences and helping build our own internal systems.My book, Building Microservices, was published by O'Reilly earlier this year.

    ... more

  • Lunch Break

  • Microservices UX: The technical journey to microservices (Russell Miles)


    “Circuit Breakers, Stranglers, Metrics, Stressors, Simian Armies, small (but not too small) services, integration styles, composite UIs, API design, API documentation, API evolution, Reactive Streams, Events, Event Sourcing, Logging, Automated deployment, blue/green switchover, flexible infrastructure, bulkheads, PaaS, Cloud, DevOps Culture, Antifragility …” the list really does go on! Whoever said adopting microservices was easy never saw the sheer list of things to be considered! But the benefits are worth it… Microservices offer an architectural style that is flexible enough to become the de-facto approach for future enterprise software systems, but the individual journeys, and pitfalls vary dramatically from context to context. Russ will share several real-world technical journeys, the tradeoffs that have been made, the tools that had to be invented and, finally, how to adopt your own effective “Microservices UX”, the best and most effective user experience for those having to plan, architect, develop, deploy and maintain microservices within their own systems.

    Russell Miles

    Russ Miles, when he’s not trying to achieve the wealth and, more importantly, the stable of motorbikes and cars of Tony Stark, is CTO and a founder of Simplicity Itself and GoMicro.Services.

    His job is to help enterprise clients adopt and get the benefits of microservices, period.

    He travels the world on this mission and, frankly, loves his job for it.

    ... more

  • Microservices <3 Domain Driven Design, why and how? (Michael Plöd)

    Without any doubt Eric Evans' book "Domain Driven Design" is being considered as a "must have read" among many IT specialists from various domains. With the emergence of Microservices Domain Driven Design has become more relevant then ever. This talk explains how the patterns and concepts of Domain Driven Design relate to Microservice architectures. In addition to that I will show off how Domain Driven Design will help you to structure and model your Microservices in terms of granularity, business context and interface design (just to name a few). 

    Michael Plöd

    Michael works a a Principal Consultant for innoQ in Germany. He has over 10 years of practical consulting experience in software development and -architecture. His main areas of interest are currently Event Sourcing, Microservices and Polyglot Persistence.

    ... more

  • Cloud in your Cloud, how we build DigitalOcean (Matthew Campbell)

    How is the cloud built? We will go into detail how we write microservices that run the cloud at scale. With tens of the thousands of customers, and 10+ datacenters. We will talk about how we write, monitor and deploy the microservices that run the cloud you use. 
    ----- 
    Digital ocean is one of the largest cloud providers on the planet with 10 different datacenters and tens of the thousands of customers. We will talk about how we use microservices to power our cloud.
    First we will talk about how we using a combination of GO, Ruby and Perl to build microservices. The trade offs of different rpcs protocols such as GRPC and http/JSON.
    Second we will dive into how we manage service discovery with Consul on thousands of nodes. 
    Third we will talk about how we monitor health and performance of the cloud. We will go into how you should build metrics into your microservices. How we use structured logging into kibana. 
    Last we will talk about different deployment strategies we have used, including some on bare metal for hypervisors. Some at virtual machines. Lastly our more modern pieces that run on Docker and Mesos. We will go through how we tried all this different techniques to find the right one for each service.

    Matthew Campbell

    Matthew Campbell is a Microservices scalability expert at DigitalOcean where he builds the future of cloud services. He wrote a book called "Microservices in Go" for O'Reilly . He recently presented at GothamGO, Velocity NYC, and GopherCon India, and blogs at "kanwisher.com":http://kanwisher.com. Matthew was a founder of "Errplane":http://errplane.com/ and "Langfight":http://www.langfight.com. In the past he worked at Thomson Reuters, Bloomberg, Gucci, and Cartoon network.

    ... more

  • Surviving Micro-services (Richard Rodger)

    With more and more teams using the microservice architecture, and gaining the speed of delivery benefits that it provides, a challenge has emerged in teams that do not have sufficient experience with message-oriented systems. The network is unreliable, has many moving parts, and it’s easy to end up in bad places. Avoiding the curse of the distributed monolith, and avoiding catastrophic failure, are immediate issues facing many new microservice systems. In this talk, a careful analysis is made of the many byzantine ways in which message-oriented systems can fail. A set of remedial approaches is presented, and an empirical report on there effectiveness will also be made. This talk will provide developers with some practical tactics to keep their microservice architectures healthy and performant.

    Richard Rodger

    Richard Rodger is chief technical officer (CTO) and co-founder of nearForm. He is an expert and thought leader in next-generation cloud and mobile technologies, with a current focus on Node.js and microservices. His book Mobile Application Development in the Cloud (Wiley, 2010) is one of the first major works on the subject.
    Richard was previously CTO of FeedHenry, a mobile application platform provider that was acquired by RedHat for €63.5m in 2014.
    Since Richard co-founded nearForm in 2011, the company has become the world’s largest Node.js and microservices consulting company.
    Richard has long been an active member and influencer of the global open source software (OSS) community, specializing in OSS for enterprise. As CTO of nearForm, he has placed OSS at the heart of how the company works. Most recently, he created Seneca.js, a microservices tool kit for Node.js that is a key component of nearForm’s software development and delivery arsenal.
    The Tao of Microservices (Manning), Richard’s new book, will be published in 2016.

    ... more

  • Microservices: A utopian mystery (Praveena Fernandes)

    Microservices promises faster development, deployments, scaling and all the goodies you always wanted but never had. Highly scalable services like Netflix and Soundcloud have successfully integrated micro services not just as a way of application development, but as a structure of how the organisation runs. Over the past year, I have worked on a transformation project which was inspired from success stories of these organisations and adopted micro services to help move away from a monolithic system to deliver value to end users quickly and reliably. We were often faced with cultural, technical, and geographical challenges around harnessing the goodness of micro services which is very different from adopting them in a startup environment.
    In this talk I will share my top lessons - these include both successes and failures - which were often difficult to digest. Most importantly, I will share the successes that at the time, looked like failures.

    Praveena Fernandes

    I work for ThoughtWorks, as a Lead Developer, consulting with leading global organisations, helping to solve problems. I am passionate about programming, which is not just a job but a hobby.

    ... more

  • Don’t Fly Blind: Logging and Metrics in Microservice Architectures (Tammo van Lessen, Alexander Heusingfeld)

    While many organizations are keen on breaking up their monolithic applications and establishing microservice architectures, only few of them truly appreciate the impact on runtime information like log data and metrics. But without it you are almost blind in production. And without correlating events from different sources it becomes very difficult to make sense of your metrics and to draw accurate conclusions. If you want to break monoliths into a variety of distributed services, standard approaches are no longer sufficient.
    In this session, we will show the conceptual foundation and best-of-breed tooling for a monitoring solution of a decentralized and distributed application landscape.

    Alexander Heusingfeld

    Alexander Heusingfeld is a senior consultant for software architecture and engineering at innoQ in Germany. As a consultant, software architect and developer he supports customers with his long-term knowings of Java and JVM-based systems. Most often he is involved in the design, evaluation and implementation of architectures for enterprise application integration (EAI), modern web-applications and microservices. He loves to contribute to OpenSource projects, speaks at IT conferences and Java User Groups and occasionally blogs at http://goldstift.de/.

    Tammo van Lessen

    Tammo van Lessen is a Senior Consultant with innoQ. He is an elected member of the Apache Software Foundation and PMC chair of Apache ODE. He co-authored a German book on BPEL and was a member of OMG’s BPMN 2.0 Finalization Task Force. He published several academic and non-academic articles on Web services & business process execution and has a weakness for rightsized software architectures, DevOps and modern monitoring tooling. He is a regular speaker on national and international conferences.

    ... more

  • Lunch Break

  • BFF Pattern in Action: SoundCloud’s Microservices (Bora Tunca)

    At SoundCloud we managed to break away from the monolith while delivering key business features. Our journey towards a microservices architecture has not been a straightforward one. We experimented a lot to reach the set of tools and technologies that we use today. We changed how we build our applications. We introduced specific apis for our mobile and web clients. We call them BFFs (backend for the frontend). They became the central piece of SoundCloud’s architecture. We rethought how we monitor our services. We created a service registry for knowledge sharing. While making all these changes, we benefited from the learnings of our peer companies. This talk will share our learnings from this journey: what worked for us and what we moved away from.


    Bora Tunca

    Bora is a software developer at SoundCloud. He started his journey there two and a half years ago. As a generalist, he has worked on various parts of their architecture. Nowadays he is part of the Core Engineering, where he helps to build and integrate the core business services of SoundCloud. When he's not juggling various languages, he's playing basketball - as long as someone on the team covers his on-call shifts...

    ... more

  • Lightning Talks II (Tobias Deekens, German Terrazas, Bodo Junglas)

    1) Micropuzzling: Implications of slicing web frontends according to Microservices. (Tobias Deekens)

    Microservices are an accepted paradigm for backend software systems and show undeniable benefits. However, web applications - especially Single Page Applications - are often developed and deployed as a monolith bearing challenges regarding extensibility and maintainability. This session illustrates practicable patterns for modular web applications from development to deployment. Topics covered will briefly focus on recent evolutions enabling modular web applications and how an split up application can be efficiently served to a browsers. Therefore, the talk will also make brief references to current frameworks to extract their patterns dealing with reusability and compressibility while also pointing out how underlying developments in web standards help lay foundations to fight commonly faced issues. Solutions proposed will also make short references to existing systems developed at E-POST Development GmbH.

    2) Automatic Test generation for REST-APIs (Bodo Junglas)

    One of the main problems of coordinating multiple development teams in a micro-service architecture relies in API documentation and contract testing:One team has to inform other teams about its APIs and depends on other teams to be conform to the APIs they provide.While there are several de-facto standards for documentation of REST-APIs, creating a reliable in test-infrastructure in regard to conformance and downward-compatible changes is still a challenge.We will discuss an approach for contract testing based on Scala-Check and Swagger.

    3) A Microservices approach for Cloud Manufacturing (German Terrazas)

    The future of industrial manufacturing increasingly depends on maintaining and expanding a resilient and sustainable sector based on sophisticated technologies, relevant knowledge and skill bases, and infrastructure that has the ability to produce a high variety of complex products faster, better and more cheaply, thus fostering the link across multiple geographically distributed manufacturers, suppliers and customers. In this talk we present our ongoing work in Cloud Manufacturing defined as an approach for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of physical manufacturing resources and capabilities that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction. Although manufacturing networks and virtual enterprise models already exist, native cloud architectures such as microservices play a key role to facilitate an optimal, efficient and fault tolerant modelling and implementation of such concept. In particular, we aim to show how our multi-layered Cloud Manufacturing conceptual architecture could be effectively delivered in terms of loosely coupled polyglot services, asynchronous communication and reactive modelling in order to virtualise, search, match, configure and combine a mixture of entities, roles, processes and information of different sorts of granularity from scratch to satisfy specific real world production requirements.

    Tobias Deekens

    Tobias is working as a front end developer within a cross-functional team developing Single Page Applications at E-POST Development GmbH. He focusses on front end architecture, tooling and testing to increase developer experience. He is also an Open Source enthusiast and loves the open web.

    Bodo Junglas

    German Terrazas

    Dr German Terrazas is a research scientist at the University of Nottingham. He has expertise in artificial intelligence, distributed systems, optimisation, stochastic simulation, explorative data mining, complex systems and information processing. After working for more than a decade in computer science, German has recently moved to engineering to focus on the research and development of innovative computing and service-oriented platforms applied to the UK manufacturing sector. His current scientific interests comprise crowd sourcing, distributed architectures, virtualisation and data analysis. German’s professional career is demonstrated by his track record of publications, some of which awarded by IEEE, the organisation of international conferences, as well as the edition of books and journals.

    ... more

  • “Running a Tight Ship”? – A Security Model for Docker Environments (Dustin Huptas)

    With the continuing success of the Docker engine, containers are increasingly moving from build chains into production environments. So it's high time to assess the current state of security of one’s container environment. Luckily, the Docker eco system is beginning to provide more and more tools to deploy security measures – some of the them being already active per default. At the same time, several pitfalls exist that could lead to a vulnerable environment.

    The talk aims to present a security model covering multiple layers from building images, to the Docker host, and daemon, and up to containers at runtime while focusing on the knobs and levers for building a secure system. 

    Dustin Huptas

    Dustin Huptas works at Germany-based Cassini Consulting, where he builds and optimizes system and network architectures, feeling home at the operations and shell level, from OSI layer 2 upwards and in DevOps-minded environments. He’s especially interested in systems and network security and the ever-changing infrastructure models.

    ... more

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Program Committee

Conrad Pöpke

Conrad Pöpke

Senior IT-Consultant at codecentric AG
Dajana Günther

Dajana Günther

Event-Organizer and CEO of Trifork Germany GmbH
Eberhard Wolff

Eberhard Wolff

Fellow, trainer and consultant at innoQ.
Jörg Müller

Jörg Müller

Development/DevOps engineer and manager at Hypoport AG.
Oliver Wehrens

Oliver Wehrens

Senior architect at E-POST, Deutsche Post DHL.
Oliver Wolf

Oliver Wolf

Principal consultant at innoQ
Timmo Freudl-Gierke

Timmo Freudl-Gierke

Senior Software Architect, MeteoGroup

Code of Conduct

All attendees, speakers, sponsors and volunteers at our conference are required to agree with the following code of conduct. Organisers will enforce this code throughout the event. We are expecting cooperation from all participants to help ensuring a safe environment for everybody.

tl;dr: Don’t be a Jerk

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The Quick Version

Our conference is dedicated to providing a harassment-free conference experience for everyone, regardless of gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, or religion (or lack thereof). We do not tolerate harassment of conference participants in any form. Sexual language and imagery is not appropriate for any conference venue, including talks, workshops, parties, Twitter and other online media. Conference participants violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the conference without a refund at the discretion of the conference organisers.

The Less Quick Version

Harassment includes offensive verbal comments related to gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, religion, sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention.

Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately.

Sponsors are also subject to the anti-harassment policy. In particular, sponsors should not use sexualised images, activities, or other material. Booth staff (including volunteers) should not use sexualised clothing/uniforms/costumes, or otherwise create a sexualised environment.

If a participant engages in harassing behavior, the conference organisers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or expulsion from the conference with no refund.

If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of conference staff immediately. Conference staff can be identified as they'll be wearing branded t-shirts.

Conference staff will be happy to help participants contact hotel/venue security or local law enforcement, provide escorts, or otherwise assist those experiencing harassment to feel safe for the duration of the conference. We value your attendance.

We expect participants to follow these rules at conference and workshop venues and conference-related social events.

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Partner user group

If you are in Berlin and want to learn more about microservices then join our partner user group at meetup

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